Category Archives: Water

Severe erosion and lack of conservation progress cause for alarm among Iowa experts

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Former Iowa Environmental Council executive director Linda Appelgate captured this image of a corn field eroding into the Nishnabotna river in 2010. According to the Iowa Farm and Rural Life Poll, nearly 80% of Iowa farmers agree they need to do more to “reduce nutrient and sediment runoff into streams and lakes.”

Last week was Soil and Water Conservation Week in Iowa, a time to reflect on how well we are protecting one of Iowa’s most precious natural resources.  Unfortunately, soil erosion remains a serious problem in our state. Recently several top experts on Iowa soil conservation weighed in and expressed alarm about the state of our soil.

The Iowa Daily Erosion Project can create estimates of soil erosion the morning after a rainfall event occurs.  Here, estimates are shown for a 2-day precipitation event on April 12-13, 2014.  Still, without advances in modeling, project manager Rick Cruse says these models do not tell the whole story of Iowa soil erosion.

The Iowa Daily Erosion Project can create estimates of soil erosion the morning after a rainfall event occurs. Here, estimates are shown for a 2-day precipitation event on April 12-13, 2014.   Still, without advances in modeling, project manager Rick Cruse says these estimates do not tell the whole story of Iowa soil erosion.

Most unsettling was a reminder from Iowa State University agronomist Rick Cruse that our present methods of estimating soil erosion are badly flawed and may be missing between 20 and 90% of the erosion in the state.  In total, Cruse estimates the economic harm to agricultural yields Iowa suffers from historic soil erosion may be as great as $1 billion each year–harm that will grow as erosion continues.

Cruse, who manages the Iowa Daily Erosion Project, said current models only account erosion that occurs evenly across the soil’s surface and fail to account for ephemeral gullies that form when heavy rainwater forms channels and washes out a trench along a slope.  He answered questions about soil erosion recently in the Des Moines Register and spoke about his research at length in an Iowa Learning Farms webinar, which is available free online.

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Public hearings are underway on CAFO clean water rule

Two fish in an Iowa waterway died during a manure spill.

Manure spills can wreak havoc on aquatic ecosystems. According to the Council’s 2012 analysis, illegal manure spills killed more than 1.2 million fish in Iowa in the prior ten years.

For over a year, the Iowa Environmental Council has been supportive of an effort to protect Iowa’s waters from harmful manure spills.  We have advocated for strong protections of Iowa’s waters and compiled data on the harm manure spills have caused to Iowa’s waters.

The next chapter of this ongoing story takes place this month as Iowa’s Environmental Protection Commission is working to complete required updates to Iowa’s rules governing how Clean Water Act permits are issued to agricultural facilities.

Under law, Iowa’s flexibility in this rulemaking is limited.  Iowa code does not permit the rules to be more stringent than specific federal requirements, and so what has been proposed is simply directly incorporating federal policy into Iowa’s rules “by reference.”

A public comment period on the proposed rules is now open through May 13.  According to the public notice for the rulemaking (which begins on page 24 of this .pdf), comments may be submitted using this method:

Any interested person may make written suggestions or comments on the proposed amendments on or before May 13, 2014. Written comments should be directed to Gene Tinker, Iowa Department of Natural Resources, Wallace State Office Building, 502 E. 9th Street, Des Moines, Iowa 50319-0034; fax (515)281-8895; or e-mail gene.tinker@dnr.iowa.gov.

In addition, six public hearings are set related to this rulemaking from May 6 to May 13:

  • May 6, 2014 6 p.m.
    Lime Creek Nature Center
    3501 Lime Creek Road, Mason City
  • May 7, 2014 6 p.m.
    Clay County Administration Building Boardroom
    300 W. 4th Street, Spencer
  • May 8, 2014 6 p.m.
    Carroll County Courthouse Meeting Room
    114 E. 6th Street, Carroll
  • May 9, 2014 11 a.m.
    Wallace State Office Building Fourth Floor Conference Room
    502 E. 9th Street, Des Moines
  • May 12, 2014 6 p.m.
    Northeast Iowa Community College Dairy Center, Room 115
    1527 Highway 150 South, Calmar
  • May 13, 2014 6 p.m.
    Washington County Conservation Board Education Center, Marr Park
    2943 Highway 92, Ainsworth

A historic victory for REAP: What happened, what comes next?

Council Executive Director Ralph Rosenberg, center, addresses the assembled crowd at Environmental Lobby Day, March 18.

Nearly 150 Iowans participated in a clean water and conservation statehouse day held on March 18 with $25 million for REAP ranked high on the list of priorities.

The last day of April brought exciting news to Iowa’s conservation community as a sequence of bills adopted by the general assembly appropriated a record $25 million to Iowa’s Resource Enhancement and Protection program.  In a flurry of activity leading up to adjournment of the 85th General Assembly, the final vote on REAP funding did not take place until after 3:00 a.m. on May 1.

This is the first time in 25 years REAP has been “fully funded” by the Iowa legislature, meaning approved funds meet or exceed the authorized level, currently $20 million.  In all, funding approved will come from three sources:

  • $16 million through HF2458, the appropriations bill for the Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship and the Department of Natural Resources.  This money comes from Iowa’s Environment First Fund.  It is noteworthy that controversial proposals in this bill to violate the spirit of the REAP funding formula and divert funds from the open spaces account were removed from the final bill.
  • $4 million through SF2349, appropriations from the Rebuild Iowa Infrastructure Fund.
  • $5 million through SF2363, a bill making various one-time appropriations to a variety of programs, including REAP and several other conservation programs.

All three of these bills will require the Governor’s signature for $25 million in REAP funding to become law.  The Governor will have approximately 30 days to act on each bill, and appropriations bills are usually subject to strong review by the Governor’s office prior to being signed.

In addition to leadership shown by numerous conservation-minded legislators, Iowa’s REAP Program is supported by approximately 37,000 Iowans who have purchased natural resource license plates.  Last year and this year, hundreds of Iowans took part in a public participation process to make recommendations for the program’s future.

In March, the Iowa Environmental Council and Iowa REAP Alliance partnered with over 30 organizations to host a clean water and conservation rally at the statehouse.  An untold number of Iowans, through conservation organizations or acting independently, spoke out in favor of providing the program this historic funding level.

Thank you to all Iowans who spoke out to help make this progress.  We do know the work of protecting clean water and a healthy environment is not finished.  Together, we will continue to push for similar funding of REAP year after year.

Editor’s note:  Many environmental issues, including controversial provisions concerning confidentiality of water quality data in Iowa’s pollution reduction efforts, have seen action in the closing hours of the legislative session.  The Council will continue to summarize legislative action on a variety of issues in the coming days.

Your calls are needed to close the deal for conservation funding

Your action is needed to close the deal for an important Iowa conservation program.

Your action is needed to close the deal for an important Iowa conservation program.

For much of the last year, Iowans have been working to support providing Iowa’s Resource Enhancement and Protection Program, $25 million in support of its 25th anniversary year.  Despite having provided approximately $300 million in conservation funding to communities in all 99 counties, the legislature has never met is obligation to fully fund the program, meaning many more community-enhancing projects have been left unfunded.


We’ve removed the instructions for taking action here, because

Thanks to the quick action of Iowans like you, reap received funding at historic levels.  learn more >>


 

Want to be ready to protect clean water and Iowa’s environment right when it matters most?  Sign up for Iowa Environmental Council e-News and action alerts now.

New report highlights threats to clean water, recreation and tourism from NE Iowa frac sand mining

From a press release by the Iowa Policy Project, a Council member organization:

Potential impacts on water quantity, water quality, recreation and tourism have prompted necessary questions about the mining of Iowa sand for fracking, researchers say.

In a new report for the nonpartisan Iowa Policy Project (IPP), researchers Aaron Kline and David Osterberg point out the environmental and aesthetic assets of Northeast Iowa may be threatened by the growing attraction of the area for this specialty sand mining.

“Trout fishing enthusiasts should be worried — but so should anyone who drinks water in the northeastern corner of Iowa. And they are,” said Osterberg, founding director and an environment and energy researcher at IPP. “Local leaders in Winneshiek and Allamakee counties have questions, and given the potential long-term impacts of this mining industry, they deserve answers.”

The new report notes the so-called “frac sand” mining industry swept through Wisconsin in recent years, and areas of both southeastern Minnesota and northeastern Iowa have deposits of the same kind of sand sought by the hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking” industry.


Learn about the Iowa Policy Project’s findings
or download the full report.


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